Migrant workers – enduring relevance

Seventh Man

 

From the brilliant Verso Publishers website: http://www.versobooks.com/books/533-a-seventh-man

‘I have to turn this prize against itself’—John Berger on accepting the Booker Prize for Fiction, 23 November 1972

In 1972, John Berger won the Booker Prize for Fiction for his novel G. He shared half of the proceeds with the Black Panthers, “the black movement with the socialist and revolutionary perspective that I find myself most in agreement with in this country”. The other half funded A Seventh Man, his study of migrant workers in Europe.

Making a direct link between Booker McConnell’s involvement in colonial exploitation of the Caribbean and the modern poverty of the region, Berger declared his intention, “as a revolutionary writer, to share this prize with people in and from the Caribbean, people who are involved in a struggle to resist such exploitation and, eventually, to expropriate companies like Booker.”

Given the current pre-occupation with ‘migrants in motion’, and all the related constructions of risk that discourses are utilising (terror, economic and cultural drain, problems in ‘over-crowding’, more terror), it seems wise to remember that this world we occupy is, has been, and continues to be built on migrant labour. The very victims of global politics and economic decisions (usually underpinned by agendas related to the long term financial and political ‘stabilisation’ of Eastern folk), are on the move, eventually becoming ‘migrant’ labour in whichever country they settle, for however short or long a period. To strip their experiences of humanity, and reduce them to numbers, ‘movement’ statistics indicated by diagrams with arrows ‘coming in’ and arrows ‘going out’ is reducing the full capacity of the human spirit. Hannah Arendt wrote about the banality of evil in relation to the holocaust and in particular the trial oin Jerusalem of Adolph Eichmann (Eichmann in Jerusalem: A report on the Banality of Evil) and as the world watches millions of people risking lives, moving, falling, crying and dying – just to seek safety, the world is at risk of perpetuating a type of banality.

Berger’s book (and other work) perhaps reconstructs that breakage for us – the disruption in ethical-biographical continuity (a play on words borrowed from Bury and Glaser and Strauss’s medical sociology terms). Putting it bluntly, there’s been a breakage in how we connect with populations undergoing suffering – it is neither new nor surprising. In fact, as Sociologists have constantly told us, we are living in an era of unprecedented rate of social change, and so we have in the middle of deep social, emotional, psychological and personal turmoil, become rather immune to those issues that don’t directly impact us.  However, our connection with suffering populations is not extinct or impossible – it is selective. We select, choose, opt to connect with lives similar to ours, not because ‘thats human nature’ – that would be playing into the cold, sociologically limp hands of cultural essentialists who argue hey, “we prefer our own kind…” (see my article at “New Diversities”). No, we choose these selective modes of connection because of a two way, dialectic: it requires less emotional energy to connect with suffering experienced by people who are similar to us in a variety of ways, and the discursive formations around which these representations are produced make them more salient, are hurled at us in specific ways.

 

When I read the sentence “Europe is literally the creation of the third world” (Frantz Fanon, The Wretched of the Earth”), I don’t simply see the vital resistance and empowered self governing machinery being articulated in the identification of first world riches generated (literally) on the backs of slaves; I read the on-going generation of capital, suffering, and constant repetition of bonded lives, generation after generation, and the many blind eyes whose averted gaze perpetuate the misery. Migrant labour is still creating the lives of people the world over who enjoy the pleasures of safety, stability, and the luxury of being. 

 

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Plot to kidnap 300 youngsters revealed – the middle classes say “we wont stand for this.”

News agencies in the UK today reported alarming news of a widespread plot to kidnap 7 to 12 year olds from several locations in the South East. The plot apparently came to light after a you tube video was leaked to news agencies in Surrey and Kent. The video containing disturbing and graphic language contained threats made by a masked man, holding a dummy of a 7 year old. The man whose identity is yet to be revealed insisted that his group of activists were acting on the “orders and wishes of a higher power, as written in the holy text”.

Concerned citizens in Kent and Surrey were interviewed last night as news of the kidnap plot came to light. One alarmed citizen said “we wont stand for this. Its an abuse of rights. They’re so young, they have their future ahead of them, and then someone comes along, out of the blue, and trashes their future. We, as a people wont stand for it, and we must do something. Its the right thing to do, its the Christian thing to do.”

Other concerned dog owners of animals between the ages of 7 and 12 have formed local activist groups to try and maintain a vigilance against any future threats of kidnapping dogs in the region.

Other news today, some young girls, somewhere else, were taken and sold into lives of torture, slavery, sexual abuse, and life long domination. The president of somewhere else, Mr Goodnight William, speaking from his presidential palace, said it was not nice. Major supermarket chains today have reported a 28% increase in the sale of Organic and Free Trade products, with Nigerian products showing a marked increase in popularity in Surrey and Kent.